Posts Tagged ‘Internet’

Jade Dragon for Sale – Own the site with 81,000 unique visitors!

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Jade Dragon bannerInterested in this incredible opportunity?

Purchase the jadedragon.com domain or own the entire collection of articles, plus social media accounts and mailing list.

Jade Dragon Online, a highly-ranked 16-year-old ezine on Asian culture, is now up for adoption.

Jade Dragon has grown into a popular dragon and is now ready to leave the nest to fly faster and further.  He has unlimited potential, as his hundreds of articles come up high in searches, having built up 16 years of search results.

With Jade Dragon Online, you can:

  • Create passive income
  • Enjoy traffic from a well-established SEO foundation
  • Reach a large audience with potential for unlimited revenue from advertising, affiliate links, email list promotions, and an online store

Along with the high search engine results, Jade Dragon also comes with a loyal and long-standing following, hundreds of articles, and much, much more. Articles appeal to martial artists, holistic health practitioners, overseas Asians, and lovers of Asian cuisine and culture.

You can obtain Jade Dragon for the highly desirable domain name and URL (www.jadedragon.com) or take over the the entire Jade Dragon entity, including 100s of articles, plus the following:

  • DragonBytes blog: 81,000+ unique visitors to the site you are visiting now
  • Jade DragonTwitter account with 469 followers
  • Facebook account with 255 friends
  • Mailing list of 201 subscribers

Though the website with all of its content has been valued at over $15,000,  all offers will be considered. (Click here for more on the website value.)

Interested in this incredible opportunity?

Please contact us at jade1@jadedragon or 619-630-7889 to make an offer or to discuss possibilities. The highest offer by 10/20/2014 will be awarded with adoption of Jade Dragon.

Also, we will be listing this site on eBay after 10/21/2014 so please contact us as soon as possible – before we open this up to the general public.



 

Google in (and out of) China

nochinamapMoments ago Google decided to close its China-based search service and redirect Web searchers to an uncensored portal in Hong Kong. (See this MarketWatch article for more info. Likely this move will be blocked by China so let’s wait to see what happens.)

As it continues to develop more and more into a super world power, China’s impact on the world is growing, effecting everything from the stock market, Internet, international business, to the value of the dollar. Chinese culture continues to submerge with other cultures worldwide, especially in America, where we are so very connected by the Internet and world trade. (See our earlier post, The Asian Hot Pot That is America.)

This dragon figures it’s time to brush up on the home country so began digging on the Internet in America (where the Internet remains mostly uncensored, even to dragons)!

Though written for college students, check out this great resource on China: 50 Lectures to Learn about the Past, Present, and Future of China. Got a greater understanding about what makes China tick! Even this Chinese dragon learned a lot from this resource!

So what’s your favorite resource for news on Asia? And how do you feel about Google getting out of China? How do you feel this decision will impact the Internet world?

 

Yeah to Google in China

This dragon applauds the stand Google is taking over censorship and hacking in China. This is what Google said in their recent blog (yeah to the power of blogging)!

“We have decided we are no longer willing to continue censoring our results on Google.cn, and so over the next few weeks we will be discussing with the Chinese government the basis on which we could operate an unfiltered search engine within the law, if at all,” the world’s leading search engine posted on its official blog yesterday. “We recognize that this may well mean having to shut down Google.cn, and potentially our offices in China.”

This dragon is especially shocked by the possibility that the Chinese government might have been hacked into Google to monitor the email accounts of human-rights activists.

What would it truly be telling the world if the Chinese government resists Google’s demands for an impartial search engine, or if the implied accusations against the government that it hacked into Google are true?

Even the White House on Thursday backed Google’s decision to no longer submit to China’s Internet censorship:

“We will be issuing a formal demarche to the Chinese government in Beijing on this issue in the coming days, probably early this week. It will express our concern for this incident and request information from China as to an explanation of how it happened and what they plan to do about it,” State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley told reporters.

And from China (not very meaningful in my opinion):

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu said Thursday at a regular press conference that “China welcomes international Internet companies to conduct business within the country according to law.”

Google is in a tough place. It knows that bad things are happening to its service in China (such as hacking and censorship), and it thinks it may have to pull out of China. But is that the right thing to do? What do you think?