Jade Dragon for Sale – Own the site with 81,000 unique visitors!

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Jade Dragon bannerInterested in this incredible opportunity?

Purchase the jadedragon.com domain or own the entire collection of articles, plus social media accounts and mailing list.

Jade Dragon Online, a highly-ranked 16-year-old ezine on Asian culture, is now up for adoption.

Jade Dragon has grown into a popular dragon and is now ready to leave the nest to fly faster and further.  He has unlimited potential, as his hundreds of articles come up high in searches, having built up 16 years of search results.

With Jade Dragon Online, you can:

  • Create passive income
  • Enjoy traffic from a well-established SEO foundation
  • Reach a large audience with potential for unlimited revenue from advertising, affiliate links, email list promotions, and an online store

Along with the high search engine results, Jade Dragon also comes with a loyal and long-standing following, hundreds of articles, and much, much more. Articles appeal to martial artists, holistic health practitioners, overseas Asians, and lovers of Asian cuisine and culture.

You can obtain Jade Dragon for the highly desirable domain name and URL (www.jadedragon.com) or take over the the entire Jade Dragon entity, including 100s of articles, plus the following:

  • DragonBytes blog: 81,000+ unique visitors to the site you are visiting now
  • Jade DragonTwitter account with 469 followers
  • Facebook account with 255 friends
  • Mailing list of 201 subscribers

Though the website with all of its content has been valued at over $15,000,  all offers will be considered. (Click here for more on the website value.)

Interested in this incredible opportunity?

Please contact us at jade1@jadedragon or 619-630-7889 to make an offer or to discuss possibilities. The highest offer by 10/20/2014 will be awarded with adoption of Jade Dragon.

Also, we will be listing this site on eBay after 10/21/2014 so please contact us as soon as possible – before we open this up to the general public.


People’s Climate March September 21

On September 21st, 2014 people from around the nation will come together in an unprecedented citizen mobilization for the People’s Climate March in New York City.

As world leaders meet at the United Nations climate change summit, hundreds of thousands of marchers will demand the world we know is within our reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet; a world safe from the ravages of climate change; a world with good jobs, clean air and water, and healthy communities. Other marches will take place around the world as we collectively call on our leaders to act on climate change.

To change everything, we need everyone on board. Here’s how you can help:

  • Take a pledge to reduce your carbon footprint and JOIN US at a march (marches happening all over the world)
  • Help Spread the word on Facebook
  • Get involved with promotion, constructing visuals, logistics, and more

For inspiration: Watch Bill McKibben’s invitation to the PCM in Rolling Stone in the video below:

People’s Climate March


21-Day Mantra Meditation Journey…

Join me on a three-week journey into the powerful world of Mantra. Each day Deva Premal and Miten will introduce a mantra with a guided meditation, followed by an exploration into its energies and meanings.

Discover for yourself how these ancient sound formulas can carry us into a state of inner peace and well being.

Sign up here for free: 21-Day Mantra Meditation Journey

“A mantra is something like a seed to be allowed to go deep into your being so that it can send its roots to the sources of your life and finally to the universal life. Then its branches, its foliage will go high into the sky, and when the right time comes, when the spring comes, it will be filled with thousands of flowers.” Osho


Biorock Coral Restoration in Bali

While snorkeling in Permuteran in northeastern Bali, I noticed these strange metal cages under the water. How strange to see coral growing out of these cages! What were these strange structures?

Later I found out they were part the Biorock Coral Restoration project. The Biorock method uses safe low-voltage electrical currents to grow natural limestone rock out of the sea on steel structures of any size or shape. This provides the nursery for the birth of baby coral.

These coral grow faster, better withstand stress, and better recover from physical damage. Within a few years, coral reefs grown with the Biorock method can revive and turn eroding beaches into growing beaches with improved water quality.

Over fifty-six Biorock coral nursery structures were installed since June 2000 in Permuteran, a village in northwest Bali, Indonesia. With a total length of 500 meters situated in an area of 2 hectares, this is the largest Biorock coral reef nursery and restoration project worldwide, exceeding the combined sizes of all other projects in the Pacific, Caribbean, and Indian Ocean.

Of the 793 species of coral in the world, Indonesia, consisting of more than 17,500 islands, has over 581 species in its waters. Indonesia’s coral reefs cover more than 85,700 square kilometers, equal to 14% of the world’s coral reef area. Unfortunately only 6% are in healthy condition due to damage caused by destructive fishing methods, uncontrolled tourism, weather, and pollution.

Damaged coral reefs take years to recover naturally. Because of these rapidly increasing global stresses, many coral reefs cannot recover naturally, as they could in the past.

Bali’s coral reefs have been severely damaged in recent years due to bombs and cyanide used by farmers, abnormally high water temperatures linked to global warming, and stresses such as anchor and diver damage, reef harvesting, dredging, and increase storm wave intensity.

If not for the Biorock project, today many of Bali’s coral reefs would be jeopardy and not the thriving underwater paradises enjoyed by so many.

Thank you Biorock for creating such a gorgeous waterscape in Bali.

I truly enjoyed snorkeling in your creation. The brilliant colors and diversity in fish and coral were truly spectacular. Gratitude to your efforts in helping to restore beauty and balance to the waters in Bali!

To support the wonderful efforts of Biorock, sponsor a baby coral by going to http://biorockbali.webs.com/

(What a cute idea to have a baby coral planted for you with your name attached, with a picture of your coral sent to you after a year of growth!)

For more information on this project, go to the  Global Coral Reef Alliance.

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Leeches – They Really Suck

“Leeches,” calmly said Ian, the manager at our lodge in Khao Sok, Thailand, in reference to hiking at the nearby park. “Bring DEET to get them off.”

“No problem,” I thought. “If I stay out of the swimming holes, I’ll be fine.” I figured they would be at least six inches long so easy to spot and avoid.


Friendly park wildlife

My friend, Sabrina, and I had come to Khao Sok because the lodge we picked was within walking distance from a national park full of waterfalls and wildlife. We’d wanted to hike in Thailand for weeks now but hadn’t found an easy way to get to places without paying for a tour or renting a motorbike.

So after breakfast and a pep/prep talk by Ian, we set out to hike in Khao Sok National Park. I was counting on some dips in waterfalls and careful immersion in the swimming holes so wore water booties, shorts, and a shirt over a swim suit.

We had a map of all of the waterfalls and swimming holes, and the farthest was about 7 kilometers (a bit over 4 miles) so seemed like an easy afternoon walk.

It had rained most of the night before so we walked through some mud and puddles while enjoying the shade of the trees. The scenery was very much as claimed, like something out of Avatar, with vines and tall canopies of trees amidst the strange calls of critters of maybe birds, insects, or larger animals. The signs claimed there even said there was wild elephants and tigers in this park!

About half an hour into our hike, Sabrina happened to look down at the crocs she was wearing and saw a little wiggly worm hanging off of her pants above the shoe. Yelling “leech!,” she knocked it off. Then we stared in horror at the culprit bouncing around on the ground. Read the rest of this entry »


Stalker Taxi Driver in Koh Pha Ngan

We dragged our weary bodies and heavy bags off the ferry at Koh Pha Ngan after half a day of mini-vans and busses. (Unfortunately there were no handicap ramps, elevators, or helpful men around to get our heavy luggage up and down the long flight of stairs so we were especially tired by the time we staggered onto the pier!)

So we emerged in the hot sun of Koh Pha Ngan, this island paradise in Thailand, and were immediately swarmed by questions such as “where are you going?” and “where are you from?” Most were songtaew (Thai taxis in the form of open-air trucks) drivers looking to charge us a bundle to take us to our resort, which was on the north end of the island away from most of the tourists and nightlife.

They wanted 150 Baht (about $5) for the ride. That seemed really high since we had just paid 550 Baht of travel (5 hours!) to get to this island.

So we refused all offers and dragged our luggage many blocks looking hoping for a bus or cheaper ride.

As walked from one street to the next, we noticed that this one woman seemed to really want to “help” us. We’d go around a corner and there she would be jabbering about her brother being part of our resort so our ride would be free at 150 Baht each (around $5 a piece), and how hard this trip would be on her truck due to the many hills. She showed up three times on three different streets and just wouldn’t seem to take “no” for an answer.

Finally we thought we had gotten lucky after seeing a van with our resort name on it. No such luck! Unfortunately our stalker got to the driver first, so he ignored our frantic waves and drove away.

Now we were even more determined not to hire her for anything! But she wasn’t done with us yet! We soon found stalker woman was heading off all taxis up the street so none of them would stop for us. Geez!

Seemed like we’d been black-balled by her!

IMG_1197ourbeachFinally we flagged down a nice couple in a songtaew and paid them the $150 Baht to the resort, which was actually about 30 minutes away up and down many hills. We didn’t save any money after that adventure, but were so happy to get to our destination where we found our own almost private beach with palm trees, warm water, and ocean breezes!

Not sure how to avoid being blackballed again in Thailand, but guess that’s what can happen to a stranger in a stranger land!

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Mystery Asian in Southeast Asia

MaryThreeQuarterWhere you from?” I was asked repeatedly while in Bali and Thailand for the last two months. Strangely enough, my two friends (two obviously not Asian types who, like me, were from America) rarely got asked this question.

Japan?” “Korea?” “Thailand?” the guesses came. “Nepal?” “Peru?” came more guesses everywhere I went! (Strange how very few guessed Chinese!)

People seemed fascinated that I looked Asian, but  had an American accent and acted like a tourist. For some reason, the concept of an Asian-American seemed so foreign.

Where did this mysterious Asian come from?! That seemed to be the burning question in almost everyone’s mind!

Eventually they would nod in understanding if I felt sorry enough for their puzzlement and told them that my parents were Chinese.

“Ah, Chinese!” they would say, as a their foreheads smoothed out and they happily sighed with relief from having solved this modern mystery.

Unfortunately, my patience wore off so I left some still wondering about my origins. (They shouldn’t feel so bad since even my parents think I look like a Korean!)

What do you think? Where do I look like I’m from?

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Fish Pedicures

IMG_0462myfeet“What, fish feeding off the dead skin on my feet?” Ew!

Well, it looked harmless enough and I didn’t see teeth like on a piranha or shark so why not?

Seems like this is the new thing on islands around the world. I saw this offered first in the Dominican Republic and now here in Thailand. Some go by the name of “Dr. Fish” and in Thailand can cost from around $2 to $7 for 15 minutes of “cleaning.” I’ve also seen this packaged as part of a tour.

We were lucky to find the low-season price of 60 Baht ($2) for 15 minutes in the Krabi Night Market. Of course, we tried to bargain for an even better price, but failed. (Later we found out what a deal we’d gotten, as it was a lot more everywhere else in Thailand!)

After rinsing off our feet, we gingerly placed them into our own private glass-walled aquarium. Before we even submerged our feet, the fish were eagerly swarming to the top of the water!

Fish soon nibbled between our toes, at our heels, at our legs, and pretty much everywhere that was underwater. Kind of tickly, but not painful in the least bit! The most popular spot seemed to be my friend’s right heel! They pretty much swarmed there non-stop!IMG_0469 Sab fish feet

Afterwards we were shocked to find that the tough skin on our heels was actually gone and our feet and legs felt softer! Much easier on the skin than those pedicures where they scrape a ton of dead skin off with those rough boards!

We looked on the web to find out more about this fish pedicure experience. Here’s what we found:

“These fish have no teeth, use their powerful sucking lips to suck away dead skin, which can stimulate acupuncture point and modulate nervous system to relax your body and releases your fatigue.”


“Garra rufa live and breed in the outdoor pools of some Turkish spas, where they feed on the skin of patients with psoriasis. The fish only consume the affected and dead areas of the skin, leaving the healthy skin to grow… (From the Wikipedia)

Wow! I needed to get some of these installed in an aquarium at home! Sounded cheaper than spa treatments and visits to dermatologists! Read the rest of this entry »


Thailand Tiger Cave Temple – No Tigers, Just Monkey Business

tigerstepsIMG_0299What? 1,237 steps to the top of the of the Tiger Cave Temple in Krabi, Thailand? It couldn’t be that hard, I thought to myself. Our tour guide gave us an hour and half to go up and back so it seemed quite doable.

Unfortunately I was very wrong! Even my friend, the exercise addict, started dragging and complaining a quarter of the way up. We had picked the hottest day of our time in Thailand to climb these steps and they were a real challenge. Armed with the bottle of water provided by the tour guide (that should have warned us!), we trudged up the steps, which varied in width, length, and steepness. Some flights of steps, more like ladders, requiring hugging the banister to climb up!

We were thankful for the few toilet stops spaced along the way, but not for the obvious reasons. Using the bucket of water for “flushing” the toilet to drench ourselves, we cooled off, but only briefly since it was so hot that our clothes dried almost immediately.

So up and up we went!

Each time we thought we were near the top, we found yet another flight of steps! All markers along the way were in Thai so no way to tell how close we were to our destination!

At the top about 45 grueling minutes later, we emerged to the sight of golden Buddhas and an altar, including Ganesha and two other figures.

The breath-taking views made it well worth the climb, though the antennas next to the Buddha just seemed out of place!

See for yourself!

On the way down, I passed many monkeys and blissfully laughed at the screams of the nearby Japanese girls. Later I found out that the monkeys love to take shiny objects and have been known to bite! (Lucky me to still have my camera!) They seemed so cute at the time, especially the mother and baby monkey. Don’t they seem harmless to you?

What a strange mix of the modern and the ancient, the civilized and the wild!

My legs finally recovered after a week, but the memories will live on for a long time!


Thai Tuk Tuk Takes Us for a Ride

tuktukIMG_0226Ever ridden a tuk tuk? If not, it’s an experience to try at least once.

These three-wheeled open-aired taxis are a common way to get around in Thailand. We tried one of these motorized rickshaws after finally arriving in Bangkok after 20+ hours of travel, followed by a few hours of confusion navigating out of the airport to take the railway to our overnight home in Khao San.

I made the mistake of getting in one without agreeing to a price so probably got charged double for this error. Being tired and feeling overwhelmed by the traffic, I thought I could negotiate after I got in the vehicle. Unfortunately he started moving forward very quickly, partially perhaps because he was being chased and chastised by an official on the street. I suspected later that it was because the official was trying to keep us from being ripped off. Instead, we took the excuse that the fare was twice as high as the estimate given at the airport because of really bad traffic.BKK _tuktuk

So we zipped down many side alleys, dodged bigger vehicles, hung on to ourselves and our luggage, and eventually arrived at our destination. In total we only spent under $7 and were too tired to care by then, but knew better than to give the guy a tip!

We later learned that most taxis (the real kind, though in Bangkok often hot pink for some reason) have a meter that helps keep them honest.

Within a week we found that tuk tuk drivers often quote one number and then try to charge you for much more after you reach your destination, making it seem as if you misunderstood the charge or acting like you’re trying to cheat him. One driver glared, scowled, and muttered at us in Thai for over 10 minutes before giving up since we weren’t paying him any more than we heard.

Riding a tuk tuk can be a risk to the wallet, especially if you’re not a good negotiator or don’t have a good idea of the going rate to your destination.

So go for a ride in a tuk tuk, but don’t be taken for a ride by a tuk tuk.

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